Money & Your Moral Compass Revisited

Back in 2016, I wrote an article on Money & Your Moral Compass. My first question was “When it comes to money, where does your moral compass point?” We all know we have bills to pay, groceries to buy, home and car purchases and repairs, expenses for work or school, pet care, contributions to nonprofits, charities and church. Where does our moral compass fit?

Since 2016, much has happened. Between the outcome of the 2016 and 2020 presidential and statewide elections, much has shifted in how we apply our money and moral compass during these tumultuous times. Then let us add COVID-19 from early 2020 to now. With our nation’s health and future of our economy still in jeopardy, how to do we each navigate these troubling times?

For many families, jobs have been lost, bills have not been paid, and loved ones have been lost to COVID or other heartbreaks. Even with the hopeful signs that businesses may be able to open more fully in the time ahead, will families be able to step up to support those struggling to survive or start again?

I tend to believe the help of others often comes from some of the most unlikely and surprising places and people, helping our families, businesses, and communities rise up again. How are you becoming part of the solution with your money and moral compass? Here are some more questions to ask ourselves:

  1. What are my core values that direct my moral compass? Do I really know what they are and how they affect others?
  2. How has my family been able to carry on in the midst of our personal and economic challenges in the past year and during 2021 as it unfolds?
  3. How have I given priority to the way I spend my money based on the impact of COVID and our nation’s political policies being enacted?
  4. In what ways am I supporting my core values, personally and politically?
  5. What is each family member’s responsibility toward being part of the solution for our family, community, and nation?
  6. How have I encouraged open and honest dialogue with my family and community during these challenges?
  7. With question #1 being answered, what are my family’s moral compass goals and specific objectives for 2021?

I hope these questions have fostered inspiration and motivation to seek answers and direction for yourself and family. Be sure to write down your answers to share with your family together. Have each family member do the same. Then watch what unfolds for family and community. You just may discover certain behaviors you want to change in order to better align with your family’s moral compass.

I hope these questions have fostered inspiration and motivation to seek answers and direction for yourself and family. Be sure to write down your answers to share with your family together. Have each family member do the same. Then watch what unfolds for family and community. You just may discover certain behaviors you want to change in order to better align with your family’s moral compass.

You may also end up with more questions to ask one another. This is a very good thing as long as those inquiries are treated with respect and safety for all concerned. There is a world of difference between “listening” and “reloading.” Let us remember an ancient verse from Isaiah 1:18, “Come now, let us reason together.”

Let us also remember, open dialogue as defined by William Isaacs, Dialogue-the Art of Thinking Together, “is a conversation with a center, not sides.” Together, you actually create something new. Taking it one step further, Isaacs’ dialogue “is a conversation in which people think together in relationship.” So, enjoy the adventure of discovery together.