Powerful Questions for 2018 . . . Week 30

posted in: CYJ Blog, Lifeskills, Wellness

As we say goodbye to July, let’s move on to the next set of questions and see how we respond to week thirty of 2018, challenging with this month’s Wellness lifeskill. These questions are offered by Bob Tiede at At Leading With Questions, from wisdom leaders around the nation and world.*

 

 

*Source: Marc Chernoff’s list of questions,
Thought Provoking Questions to Ask Yourself in 2018.

Question 1: What do you do to relieve stress?

And you tell me not to worry!!

I confess. I eat chocolate! On a more serious note, I work on a weaving project, exercise on treadmill and total gym, ask for a hug, and revisit one of God’s promises for me. Between them all and chocolate, life is good, no matter what!

Question 2: What are the primary components of a happy life?

All the above response to question one! And let’s add one more essential ingredient to a happy life. . . an ever grateful and hopeful heart.

Question 3: What makes you angry? Why?

I could say based on my above response when I run out of chocolate! I really don’t get angry very often. Anger is simply an emotion we all have. Whether it helps, or hurts depends on how we behave when we get angry. When I do get angry at myself, I tend to chide myself for whatever I did or didn’t do. I become very impatient with myself. When I am angry with someone else, I avoid them for a while until I gain a calmer and conciliatory perspective.

In earlier years, I was quite adept at pouting about something that didn’t go my way. Even though I considered myself a positive encourager, pouting and the silent treatment wasn’t far behind. Just ask my hubby, John! I learned the hard way my attitude weighs heavily on my emotional as well as physical wellbeing. I also learned it was not my responsibility or right to try to control others who may see things differently. Yet, I am responsible for my own behavior that follows.

Question 4: When was the last time you lost your temper? About what?

I could say when someone ate the last bite of chocolate! Ok. Maybe not. I tend to hide a supply from tempting mouths for just an occasion! No temper tantrum necessary! There is one thing that does frustrate me on several occasions that one could say I “almost” lost my temper. It has to do with mealtime.

With my daily disciplines I must eat on schedule to maintain proper blood sugar levels and other metabolic challenges. On those days my husband says he is going to do the meals, I look forward to whatever he prepares. He works hard at following my dietary regimen, and that’s not an easy task! Yet, he often gets sidetracked in his office, garage, or yard with other “important” stuff.

Mealtime seems to simply disappear from his consciousness. That is, until I storm into the kitchen and madly put something together, raddling as many pots and pans as I can to take notice! I guess you would define that behavior as “losing my temper” right?! I have been trying to be kinder about his “wanderings” by simply taking care of myself with the gratitude I should have for the food available and blessed life.

Always good to regain that calmer, conciliatory perspective, isn’t it? Didn’t I say earlier, “life is good, no matter what?” I think I just ate my words as a snack!!

Question 5: What good comes from suffering?

Good can come from suffering only if we hold on to the kind of hope that never disappoints. When we do hold on, the good gifted is a grateful heart for what we have . . . faith, family, friends. Somehow, even during our suffering, we can reach out to encourage someone needing that kind of hope and compassion. With this redeeming perspective, we can even begin to possibly see a solution to whatever suffering lingers, whether sickness, loss, a broken relationship. Hope rises for us all.

Question 6: What is the closest you have ever come to fearing for your life?

There are two times I came close to fearing for my life. For those who follow my byline, you will probably already know my health and life were at risk through many years. That risk was even at about six years old, with a tonsillectomy surgery. The surgeon told my mother the tonsils were so dangerously infected that blood poisoning was at high risk. Thank God for penicillin at the time that saved my life (although the dose was so high, I became allergic from that point on).

The other time was when my family was on a camping trip and we were traveling a very narrow, high elevation mountain road with tight curves at every turn. It was also getting darker by the moment. Needless to say, I was praying the whole way we would stay on the road! I also tried very hard to never look over the edge at the valley far below!

Question 7: What is your most striking physical attribute?

Now, who would ever ask this question to a 73-year-old! When I look in the mirror, I try hard to see myself when I was in my twenties to forties, and not beyond! I could say then I was well configured! What do I really see today? Besides the multiple wrinkles and wear, there is my smile. Hopefully, that will reflect a still beating grateful and hopeful heart.

Now, it’s your turn again to consider what you do to relieve stress, have a happy life, discover good from suffering, and what you consider your most striking physical attribute, no matter the age, when you think of “wellness” and your life.